Croatia – Hvar

I supposed the whole point of the trip was Hvar. It hadn’t been at the forefront at all during our initial planning stages, but after Becky and Veronica’s friend filled us in on the must-sees, must-dos, it was clear it would be the apex of our trip.

We hopped on a ferry from Split to Hvar town, which is roughly an hour or so  long. The ferry cost less than $10 a person. Our incredibly beautiful, ridiculously strong and kind Airbnb host gave us some amazing recommendations as soon as we arrived. She enthusiastically encouraged us to rent a boat and see all the little islands around Hvar. Which we did. For two days. For less than $80 a person.

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Our handsome Croatian skipper took us to the natural wonders: the red rocks, the blue cave, the green lagoon as well as quiet private beaches where we contented ourselves with selfie shoots, floating on the salty, sunwarmed water and eating fresh fish from little, chic cafes that were precariously positioned on the rocky shores. Sunburned and happy, we would watch the sunset on the boat, head home to shower and have an indulgent meal in Hvar town.

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It was epically beautiful, not overwhelmingly touristy, and relaxed and indulgent.

EAT:

MACONDO – We went back twice to this little al fresco alleyway. The second time, they immediately brought us our favorite wine (we had four bottles the night before – insert big eyes emoji) and Evan’s sunglasses that he didn’t even remember he had left. Their popular dish is gregada, an abundance of local fish, including seabass, bream, and shellfish, slow cooked in butter and garlic. So fresh and beautiful and we totally slurped up the sauce in a spoon. The desserts here are the best we had in Croatia. The pastry chef – the owner’s wife – makes a killer tiramisu that we had to come back for.

LUVIJI – This rooftop terrace restaurant seats like five people. Just kidding, but it’s a small intimate restaurant with twinkle lights and vines, wine and olive oil from their own vineyards and farms, and the most charming host. The family-owned restaurant looks over the cathedral and country-side, lending to the fairy-tale feeling.

 

 

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